Late Marriage

1 hour and 42 Minutes and 5 seconds , 2001
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Directed by: Dover Kosashvili
Production: TransFax Film Productions
Cast: Lior Ashkenazi, Ronit Elkabetz, Moni Mushonov, Lili Kosashvilli, Rosina Cambus

Zaza is pushing 32 and his Georgian family is eager to see him fall in line with tradition and get married. What this means is a beautiful bride, no older than 18, of a reputable Georgian home, with well-to-do parents, and an unblemished reputation. Zaza himself is considered quite the catch on the Georgian immigrant community’s matchmaking scene and as such, his parents make a point of dragging him out to consider prospective brides on a nightly basis. An unwilling Zaza who may feel like he has no choice but to resign himself to tradition, reluctantly plays along. However, unbeknownst to his parents, Zaza has been having a relationship with a Jewish Moroccan divorcée who is also the mother of a six-year-old girl. Judith is the epitome of what Zaza truly desires but could never find within the confinements of family and tradition. One evening, Zaza’s parents blow the lid off their son’s double life. He must now make the ultimate choice – surrender himself completely to tradition or to love.
Dover Kosashvili’s debut film, starring Lior Ashkenazi and the late Ronit Elkabetz is a milestone in Israeli Film history and is viewed by many as the harbinger of Israeli film’s Golden Age which came on the heels of the then-new Film Act (the law that essentially formalised government funding for Israeli Film.)
The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and was subsequently screened in countless festivals, winning numerous awards including the Wolgin Award for the Best Israeli Film at the Jerusalem Film Festival and ten Ophir Awards, including Best Screenplay, Best Lead Actor (Ashkenazi), and Lead Actress (Elkabetz).
Late Wedding was one of the most watched Israeli films of the early ‘00s, recording well over 300,000 ticket sales, and has played a pivotal role in rebuilding and restoring local filmgoers’ faith in Israeli Cinema

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